Tips to Modernize Dated Furniture, Décor and Accessories

Be it fashion, furniture or accessories we love to follow trends. We do love our classics but things that are passé doesn’t suit the current trends of interiors and décor. We need to ask ourselves one question- Why do some homes look dated and tired while others always look fresh and current? Given below are some of comparisons sorted for your clear understanding of dated and contemporary styling of interiors.

Damask is a pattern which garnered popularity in the 90’s which can be updated by a large statement bloom instead in today’s interiors.

A large bloom looks quite classy and chic instead of continuous damask pattern which after a point becomes monotonous.

Fast furniture is the easy-to-assemble (and even easier to afford) designs which really blew up in the mid-1980s and have been going strong since. The modern version of fast furniture is simple and bold colour functional pieces like these ones.

Tuscan furniture was quite popular during the 2000 which got replaced by the Italian furniture which has a special place in everybody’s home these days.

An interior in Italian furniture looks chic and comfortable for modern living. The appeal is quite invigorating.

In the 80’s the pastel story was all about dusty blue or dusty pink colour which did not give a clean look. Today’s pastel story is about muted tones of pink and blue and everything light in shade which gives a very classy touch to any interiors.

The industrial styling of furniture was all about using bare lights hanging from the walls but these days the lighting effect has changed a most composed and sophisticated form of lighting effect has taken its place.

The MD and Creative Head of Spacio Mr.Navin Kanodia says “The interiors today is also about timeless pieces which has been in the history but has modified and nurtured itself to fit into the trend of time. We want our readers to seek out designs, styles and colors that are considered to be “dated,” and have been given a touch a modernity through revamping.”

 

Coleccion Alexandra where every creation echoes “emotions”.

EMOTIONS has been crafted to meet the needs and aspirations of the modern day Cosmopolitan, whilst reinforcing Coleccion Alexandra’s uniqueness. EMOTIONS style is uncompromisingly sleek. Clean lines marry together with subtle and neutral tones, exposing the quality of the materials used. Uncomplicated and minimalistic design shrouds functionality and a mesmerising attention to detail. The details themselves set these collections apart and it is through these details that each piece assumes individuality. We will see some of the mesmerising creation from the collection in this blog.

Boston Collection
Boston Collection

Only the world’s finest materials are sourced and used, ensuring every piece epitomises luxury. Cutting edge technologies, used in conjunction with ancient hand carving techniques create works of art, which stand-alone with consummate elegance.

Wind collection
Wind collection

EMOTIONS has been crafted to meet the needs and aspirations of the modern day cosmopolitan. Whether used for residential properties or commercial premises, these collections adapt themselves with perfection. The collections include furniture, lighting, textiles, rugs and accessories, allowing for entire projects to be completed harmoniously and ensuring rooms flow seamlessly from one to another.

Bowie Collection
Bowie Collection

Art meets furniture

The style of EMOTIONS is uncomplicated and minimalistic design shrouds functionality and a mesmerising attention to detail. The details themselves set these collections apart and it’s through these details that each piece assumes individuality. Only the world’s finest materials are sourced and used, ensuring every piece epitomises luxury. Cutting edge technologies, used in conjunction with ancient hand carving techniques create works of art, which stand alone with consummate elegance.

Lift Collection
Lift Collection
Valentina Collection
Valentina Collection

EMOTIONS is Coleccion Alexandra’s most avant-garde segment, in which innovation and passion have molded their most current and contemporary collections. The company has been evolving since its conception and this collection represents the very forefront of its design. EMOTIONS epitomises contemporary style, whilst reinforcing Coleccion Alexandra’s uniqueness. Whilst the designs have developed over the decades, Coleccion Alexandra’s core principles stand steadfast. The collections are created to be adaptable and meet every whim. Every piece is a blank canvas, which clients can fill with their own creativity. Each product is crafted with passion and love and every component is treated with unwavering respect. Every creation echoes the ‘emotions’ of Coleccion Alexandra.

Pillow Talk: Learn the Lingo of Cushions

Cushions and pillows in any space introduce color, texture and form — all vital design elements when you’re finessing a room. These days we are bombarded with all kinds of styles and shapes of cushions, and here you’ll learn the ins and outs of this surprisingly complex piece of decor from Spacio Designers. Then you can impress your cushion maker with your knowledge of terms such as “bobble fringe,” “knife edge” and “Turkish corner.”

 

cushion1

 

The word “cushion” was used in writings as far back as the Middle Ages. Made of sackcloth or leather, filled with hair or wool and often embroidered, these large items were more like the floor pillows of today.In the U.S., the terms “pillow” and “cushion” can be interchangeable. In many other Western countries, a pillow is usually larger and for sleeping, while a cushion is used for lounging.

 

Most standard cushions on the market are 17 by 17 inches square. This is because a standard roll of fabric is 54 inches wide. Allowing for seams, three 18-inch pieces of fabric can be cut, avoiding wastage. Custom-designed cushions may cost a little more, but they open up a world of possibilities.

cushion2

The knife-edge cushion is the simplest and most popular of all the cushions. It has just two pieces of fabric and four side seams that taper into sharp corners. Why not add a border in another color to an otherwise monochromatic cushion, as shown here?

 

If you want a zipper, get one that matches the fabric color. You can also ask for an envelope-back cover — as the name suggests, the back fabric is overlapped to create the closure.

 

The insert in a knife-edge cushion tends to look fuller in the middle and thinner on the edges. Use a feather-down blend, which will hold its shape and doesn’t need as much fluffing as a 100 percent down insert.

 

cushion3

The box cushion has a top, a bottom and four sides. The sides are called the boxing, and can be from 1 inch to 10 or more inches deep, depending on the overall size and use of the cushion. This banquette has box cushions for both the seating and on top of it. Keep in mind that the seat cushion will flatten in half when you sit on it, so be generous with your measurements.

 

Piping, also called welting, can add structure. This can be either in the same fabric, known as self-piping, or in a contrasting color. If you have other cushions in the room, link that color to your piping.

 

The insert should be firm and enhance the structure of the cushion. Synthetic inserts, such as hypoallergenic polyester, are a smart choice for cushions that will suffer from wear and tear. Just as comfortable as feather-down inserts, they’re also great substitutes if you’re allergic to feathers.

cushion4

The embellished cushion allows you to be creative. A room takes on a distinct personality when you think hard about your cushion design.

 

Embellishments are many and varied. Bobble fringes with pom-poms look playful. Ruched or cut fringes look soft and feminine. Braided and flanged cords in contrasting colors add elegance. All cushion makers carry an array of trims and give great advice.

 

Another tip when buying the insert: Make sure it is encased in a tightly woven fabric, like cotton. This will stop the feathers from popping through. The insert also needs to fill the corners of the cover. If you like the plump look, get an insert that’s the same size as the cover — if not, get one an inch or two smaller.

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The Turkish-corner cushion, in my opinion, is not done enough. If you don’t like the sharp corners you get with a knife-edge cushion, try Turkish corners.

 

The treatment is called pinch pleating. This works on the knife-edge cushion and the box cushion when it is a scattered — not a seat — cushion. The pleats create neat, rounded tucks at each corner. This treatment is used to great effect on this blue-gray plaid back cushion.

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Taupe Turkish Corner Pillow Cover
Here’s a closer shot of a Turkish corner. With this style, the insert fits right up into the corners, so this cushion doesn’t have the flat, pointy look of other cushions.

cushion7

The bolster cushion has many uses. Its tubular shape with round ends is a great head support for something like reading in bed, and a helpful armrest on a banquette. Bolsters also break the visual monotony of traditional cushions.

 

As with round cushions, piping can help create a neat finish. Use a color that is already in the room for your piping.

 

Bolster cushions may or may not have zippers. After the loose filling is inserted, the seam is closed with a slip stitch. If you don’t go with a zipper, remember to choose hard-wearing fabric, as spot cleaning will be your only option.

cushion8

The flanged cushion is also a change from the standard knife-edge cushion. A flange is a piece of fabric that extends beyond the seam, giving the cushion a gentle, fluttery effect.

 

Flanged cushion covers can be made with the same fabric as the cover itself (called a self-border) or as an integrated border with a contrasting fabric. These striped pillows sitting on the chairs have the flange on the vertical, rather than all sides. Using the same fabric but turning the pattern a different way includes both ideas and gives you a stunning result.

Living in Big Spaces : Three things that makes a big difference

living-room-spacio

 

This May, we’re all about Small Spaces, a bread-and-butter topic on Spacio and a personal favorite of ours. No doubt we’ll cover lots of tips, inspiration and ideas for small-space living over the coming weeks, but first let’s revisit what we already know works. Here are three classic ways to make living little work for you.

 

Lighting

Small is one thing, but small and dark is quite another. Almost nothing has the power to transform a room like lighting.

 

Work with the natural light available to you by keeping furniture low and out of the light’s path, using window treatments which let in as much light as possible, and by using reflective surfaces like mirrors to increase the light’s throw. In terms of artificial light, make sure you have sufficient general, ambient and task lighting for all the ways in which you use the space. Once it’s properly lit, even a small room can feel spacious.

 

Organization & Storage

It goes without saying that in a small space, storage, and more importantly, organization, is key.Furniture with added storage and built-ins are a great way to achieve the former, and the latter comes down to habit forming and learning to live with less. It’s a constant struggle for many of us, but tidying regularly and paring down will make a big difference in fully embracing your small home, not simply making do with it.

 

Versatility & Flexibility

In a small space with multiple uses, having a flexible layout and/or furniture can be a saving grace. Search out pieces with multiple uses: a desk/dining table hybrid (or even a wall-mounted dining table), a comfortable and stylish sofa bed, nesting tables and rolling pieces can all make life a little easier for the small apartment dweller.